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Russian small businesses: entrepreneurship in transition. Exploratory investigation of the factors that pushed and pulled individuals to open their own business in the Krasnodar region of Russia

Mityay, Evgeniya (2012) Russian small businesses: entrepreneurship in transition. Exploratory investigation of the factors that pushed and pulled individuals to open their own business in the Krasnodar region of Russia. Other thesis, University of Westminster, Westminster Business School.

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Abstract

The purpose of this research was to identify the factors that pushed and pulled individuals to become self-employed in Russia during the post-Soviet Union period. The research methodology adopted in this study was qualitative. The longitudinal multiple case study approach was comprised of in-depth interviews with the founders and co-founders of 26 family businesses in the Krasnodar region of Russia. To summarise particular findings of the present research one push factor and four pull factors have been identified as being the most influential: 1. ‗Unemployment / Restructuring‘ during the transitional period push factor; 2. ‗The Demand for Local Services‘ pull factor; 3. ‗The Development of Entrepreneurial Skills‘ pull factor; 4. The ‗Cultural Changes‘ pull factor; and 5. The ‗Family Relatedness‘ pull factor. This thesis postulates that a contribution to the understanding of the push-pull debate theory can be made through an interpretation of the factors that influence individuals‘ decisions to become self-employed. A significant body of worldwide research currently exists that deals with the concept of the self-employment push-pull debate. There is however no one agreed view on which factors push or pull individuals to become self-employed. An analysis of various literature sources has at times revealed contradictions and inconsistencies within this debate. This observation can be partly explained by the fact that this body of research exists across a diverse range of countries and through time. This thesis highlights the fact that a clear dichotomy of the self-employment push and pull factors may not always be adequate. This analysis highlights that what really matters when identifying the factors that push or pull individuals to become self-employed is how the individuals themselves interpret these factors. Therefore any factor potentially could be considered as being both push and pull depending upon the individual‘s personal interpretation.

Item Type:Thesis (Other)
Research Community:University of Westminster > Westminster Business School
ID Code:10346
Deposited On:08 Mar 2012 16:08
Last Modified:08 Mar 2012 16:08

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