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Spatial justice: law and the geography of withdrawal

Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, Andreas (2010) Spatial justice: law and the geography of withdrawal. International Journal of Law in Context, 6 (3). pp. 201-216. ISSN 1744-5523

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S174455231000011X

Abstract

While spatial justice could be the most radical offspring of law’s recent spatial turn, it remains instead a geographically informed version of social justice. The majority of the existing literature on the subject has made some politically facile assumptions about space, justice and law, thereby subsuming the potentially radical into the banal. In this article, I suggest that the concept of spatial justice is the most promising platform on which to redefine, not only the connection between law and geography, but more importantly, the conceptual foundations of both law and space. More concretely, the article attempts two things: first, a radical understanding of legal spatiality. Space is not just another parameter for law, a background against which law takes place, or a process that the law needs to take into consideration. Space is intertwined with normative production in ways that law often fails to acknowledge, and part of this article is a re-articulation of the connection. Second, to suggest a conception of spatial justice that derives from a spatial law. Such a conception cannot rely on given concepts of distributive or social justice. Instead, the concept of spatial justice put forth here is informed by post-structural, feminist, post-ecological and other radical understandings of emplacement and justice, as well as arguably the most spatial of philosophical discourses, that of Deleuze–Guattari and the prescribed possibilities of space as manifold.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Law, School of
ID Code:10404
Deposited On:18 Apr 2012 13:20
Last Modified:18 Apr 2012 13:20

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