WestminsterResearch

Law students as peer mentors: developing the reflective practitioner and/or embedding legal learning: correspondent's report from the United Kingdom

Webley, Lisa (2011) Law students as peer mentors: developing the reflective practitioner and/or embedding legal learning: correspondent's report from the United Kingdom. Legal Ethics, 14 (2). pp. 250-251. ISSN 1460-728X

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

With a major review of legal education and training underway in England and Wales, post the introduction of the Legal Services Act 2007 and the prospect of alternative business structures, and a gearing up for the new higher education fees regime as of September 2012, it is perhaps no surprise that many law schools are considering new ways of distinguishing themselves from their competitors through curriculum design and student support structures. The recent Society of Legal Scholars Legal Education stream was packed full of papers on learning and teaching innovation in the undergraduate law curriculum. Elements of good practice were brought out in the Learning in Law Annual Conference in January. The Association of Law Teachers continues to be a testing ground for much legal education innovation and the annual OUP Law Teacher of the Year award is a testament to the importance of learning and teaching and also students' perceptions of learning and teaching (they get to nominate staff for consideration). The National Student Survey, undertaken yearly and nationwide, has underlined the importance of students' views on their learning and teaching experience. Results for each law school are scrutinised with alacrity as deans, heads of department, course leaders and directors of learning and teaching try to glean best practice and poor practice examples which they can use to shape the way in which the law degree should be augmented and enhanced with the minimum extra resource allocation. Higher education funding is tight, and getting tighter, so many law schools need to do more with less while competing with private providers with strong track records in vocational training who have recently entered the undergraduate market. They also need to meet the changing needs of an increasingly diverse undergraduate law student population, which bring challenges as well as real benefits to law schools.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Law, School of
ID Code:10579
Deposited On:06 Jun 2012 16:12
Last Modified:06 Jun 2012 16:12

Repository Staff Only: item control page