WestminsterResearch

Protein kinase C mediates delayed inhibitory feedback regulation of human neurokinin type 1 receptor activation of phospholipase C in UC11 astrocytoma cells

Barr, Alastair J. and Watson, Steve P. (1994) Protein kinase C mediates delayed inhibitory feedback regulation of human neurokinin type 1 receptor activation of phospholipase C in UC11 astrocytoma cells. Molecular Pharmacology, 46 (2). pp. 266-273. ISSN 0026-895X

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Human UC11 astrocytoma cells were used to investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and other kinases in neurokinin (NK)1 receptor desensitization. The selective NK1 receptor agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]-substance P stimulated a biphasic accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates ([3H]IPs) in the presence of 10 mM LiCl in cells that had been prelabeled with [3H]inositol. An initial rapid phase of [3H]IP accumulation during the first 1 min was followed by a slower sustained phase for up to 90 min. These results demonstrate that the human NK1 receptor desensitizes rapidly but only partially. The selective PKC inhibitor Ro31-8220 did not prevent rapid NK1 receptor desensitization but after a longer incubation significantly potentiated human NK1 receptor agonist-stimulated accumulation of [3H]IPs. These results suggest that, although PKC does not mediate the process of rapid desensitization, it does have an inhibitory role at later times. This conclusion is supported by studies with staurosporine, phorbol dibutyrate, and the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. Studies using AlF4-, an agent that can directly activate G proteins, and Ro31-8220 suggested that PKC can exert inhibitory effects 'downstream' of receptor activation, although immunoprecipitation of the G proteins alpha q/alpha 11 demonstrated that they do not undergo phosphorylation in UC11 cells and are unlikely to be the target of PKC-mediated inhibitory feedback. Delayed inhibitory feedback by PKC may be mediated by phosphorylation of phospholipase C, although an additional site of action on the NK1 receptor cannot be ruled out.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:10861
Deposited On:20 Jul 2012 13:59
Last Modified:20 Jul 2012 13:59

Repository Staff Only: item control page