WestminsterResearch

Investigating relationships between road freight transport, facility location, logistics management and urban form

Allen, Julian and Browne, Michael and Cherrett, Tom (2012) Investigating relationships between road freight transport, facility location, logistics management and urban form. Journal of Transport Geography, 24 . pp. 45-57. ISSN 0966-6923

Full text not available from this repository.

Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2012.06.010

Abstract

This paper examines road freight transport activity and its relationship with facility location, logistics management and urban form through an analysis of 14 selected urban areas in the UK. Improved understanding of this relationship will assist planners when making transport and land use decisions. The findings suggest that several geographical, spatial and land use factors have important influences on freight activity in urban areas. Commercial and industrial land use patterns affect the types and quantities of goods produced, consumed, and hence the total quantity of freight transport handled. This also influences the distances over which goods are moved and by what specific mode. There has been relatively low growth in warehousing in many of the selected areas over the last decade compared to the national average as well suburbanisation of warehousing in some locations. This affects the origin and destination of journeys visiting these facilities and typically increases the distance of such journeys. A greater proportion of road freight has been shown to be lifted on internal journeys in large urban areas than in smaller ones. Journeys within urban areas have been shown to be less efficient than journeys to and from the urban area in the 14 locations studied due to the much smaller average vehicle carrying capacities and lower lading factors for journeys within urban areas. The length of haul on journeys to and from urban areas studied was found to be greatest for those areas with a major seaport and/or which were geographically remote. This affects the road freight transport intensity of goods transport journeys.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Architecture and the Built Environment, School of
ID Code:10967
Deposited On:30 Jul 2012 14:11
Last Modified:30 Jul 2012 14:11

Repository Staff Only: item control page