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Henipavirus neutralising antibodies in an isolated island population of African fruit bats

Peel, Alison J. and Baker, Kate S. and Crameri, Gary and Barr, Jennifer A. and Hayman, David T.S. and Wright, Edward and Broder, Christopher C. and Fernández-Loras, Andrés and Fooks, Anthony R. and Wang, Lin-Fa and Cunningham, Andrew A. and Wood, James L. N. (2012) Henipavirus neutralising antibodies in an isolated island population of African fruit bats. PLoS ONE, 7 (1). e30346. ISSN 1932-6203

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030346

Abstract

Isolated islands provide valuable opportunities to study the persistence of viruses in wildlife populations, including population size thresholds such as the critical community size. The straw-coloured fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, has been identified as a reservoir for henipaviruses (serological evidence) and Lagos bat virus (LBV; virus isolation and serological evidence) in continental Africa. Here, we sampled from a remote population of E. helvum annobonensis fruit bats on Annobón island in the Gulf of Guinea to investigate whether antibodies to these viruses also exist in this isolated subspecies. Henipavirus serological analyses (Luminex multiplexed binding and inhibition assays, virus neutralisation tests and western blots) and lyssavirus serological analyses (LBV: modified Fluorescent Antibody Virus Neutralisation test, LBV and Mokola virus: lentivirus pseudovirus neutralisation assay) were undertaken on 73 and 70 samples respectively. Given the isolation of fruit bats on Annobón and their lack of connectivity with other populations, it was expected that the population size on the island would be too small to allow persistence of viruses that are thought to cause acute and immunising infections. However, the presence of antibodies against henipaviruses was detected using the Luminex binding assay and confirmed using alternative assays. Neutralising antibodies to LBV were detected in one bat using both assays. We demonstrate clear evidence for exposure of multiple individuals to henipaviruses in this remote population of E. helvum annobonensis fruit bats on Annobón island. The situation is less clear for LBV. Seroprevalences to henipaviruses and LBV in Annobón are notably different to those in E. helvum in continental locations studied using the same sampling techniques and assays. Whilst cross-sectional serological studies in wildlife populations cannot provide details on viral dynamics within populations, valuable information on the presence or absence of viruses may be obtained and utilised for informing future studies.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:11310
Deposited On:24 Oct 2012 15:03
Last Modified:03 Oct 2013 12:58

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