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Polynucleotide phosphorylase is a global regulator of virulence and persistency in Salmonella enterica

Clements, Mark O. and Eriksson, Sofia and Thompson, Arthur and Lucchini, Sacha and Hinton, Jay C. D. and Normark, Staffan J. and Rhen, Mikael (2002) Polynucleotide phosphorylase is a global regulator of virulence and persistency in Salmonella enterica. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 99 (13). pp. 8784-8789. ISSN 0027-8424

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Official URL: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.132047099

Abstract

For many pathogens, the ability to regulate their replication in host cells is a key element in establishing persistency. Here, we identified a single point mutation in the gene for polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) as a factor affecting bacterial invasion and intracellular replication, and which determines the alternation between acute or persistent infection in a mouse model for Salmonella enterica infection. In parallel, with microarray analysis, PNPase was found to affect the mRNA levels of a subset of virulence genes, in particular those contained in Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. The results demonstrate a connection between PNPase and Salmonella virulence and show that alterations in PNPase activity could represent a strategy for the establishment of persistency. Copyright (2002) National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Online ISSN 1091-6490
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:1537
Deposited On:12 May 2006
Last Modified:16 Dec 2009 12:57

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