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Molecular dissection of the human antibody response to the structural repeat epitope of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite from a protected donor

Chappel, Jonathan A. and Rogers, William O. and Hoffman, S.L. and Kang, Angray S. (2004) Molecular dissection of the human antibody response to the structural repeat epitope of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite from a protected donor. Malaria Journal, 3 (28). ISSN 1475-2875

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-3-28

Abstract

Background: The circumsporozoite surface protein is the primary target of human antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites, these antibodies are predominantly directed to the major repetitive epitope (Asn-Pro-Asn-Ala)n, (NPNA)n. In individuals immunized by the bites of irradiated Anopheles mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites in their salivary glands, the antirepeat response dominates and is thought by many to play a role in protective immunity. Methods: The antibody repertoire from a protected individual immunized by the bites of irradiated P. falciparum infected Anopheles stephensi was recapitulated in a phage display library. Following affinity based selection against (NPNA)3 antibody fragments that recognized the PfCSP repeat epitope were rescued. Results: Analysis of selected antibody fragments implied the response was restricted to a single antibody fragment consisting of VH3 and VkI families for heavy and light chain respectively with moderate affinity for the ligand. Conclusion: The dissection of the protective antibody response against the repeat epitope revealed that the response was apparently restricted to a single VH/VL pairing (PfNPNA-1). The affinity for the ligand was in the mM range. If anti-repeat antibodies are involved in the protective immunity elicited by exposure to radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites, then high circulating levels of antibodies against the repeat region may be more important than intrinsic high affinity for protection. The ability to attain and sustain high levels of anti-(NPNA)n will be one of the key determinants of efficacy for a vaccine that relies upon anti-PfCSP repeat antibodies as the primary mechanism of protective immunity against P. falciparum.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:1546
Deposited On:12 May 2006
Last Modified:11 Aug 2010 15:30

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