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Nonequivalence of on-line and paper-and-pencil psychological tests: the case of the prospective memory questionnaire

Buchanan, Tom and Ali, Tarick and Heffernan, Thomas M. and Ling, Jonathan and Parrott, Andrew C. and Rodgers, Jacqui and Scholey, Andrew B. (2005) Nonequivalence of on-line and paper-and-pencil psychological tests: the case of the prospective memory questionnaire. Behavior Research Methods, 37 (1). pp. 148-154. ISSN 1554-351X

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Abstract

There is growing evidence that Internet-mediated psychological tests can have satisfactory psychometric properties and can measure the same constructs as traditional versions. However, equivalence cannot be taken for granted. The prospective memory questionnaire (PMQ; Hannon, Adams, Harrington, Fries-Dias, & Gibson, 1995) was used in an on-line study exploring links between drug use and memory (Rodgers et al., 2003). The PMQ has four factor-analytically derived subscales. In a large (N = 763) sample tested via the Internet, only two factors could be recovered; the other two subscales were essentially meaningless. This demonstration of nonequivalence underlines the importance of on-line test validation. Without examination of its psychometric properties, one cannot be sure that a test administered via the Internet actually measures the intended construct.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Online ISSN 1554-3528
Research Community:University of Westminster > Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, School of
ID Code:1712
Deposited On:01 Jun 2006
Last Modified:04 Nov 2009 14:47

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