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The effects of sex and age of responders on the reliability of self-diagnosed infection: a study of self-reported urinary schistosomiasis in Tanzanian school children

Ansell, Juliet and Guyatt, Helen L. and Hall, Andrew and Kihamia, Charles M. and Bundy, Donald A.P. (2001) The effects of sex and age of responders on the reliability of self-diagnosed infection: a study of self-reported urinary schistosomiasis in Tanzanian school children. Social Science & Medicine, 53 (7). pp. 957-967. ISSN 0277-9536

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(01)00102-2

Abstract

Self-reported schistosomiasis has been proven to be a reliable estimation of the prevalence of infection in school children. For the first time, this paper presents an investigation into the use of self-reported schistosomiasis to estimate the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis, due to Schistosoma haematobium, in school children with particular emphasis on whether the age and sex of respondents influences the reliability of diagnosis. It is shown first, that the prevalence and intensity of infection vary with sex; infection in boys is always more prevalent and more intense than in girls of the same age and second, that age and sex influence the reliability of self-reported schistosomiasis as a diagnostic method. Age and sex are factors that should be considered when implementing control measures in endemic areas.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Schistosoma haematobium, Diagnosis, Sensitivity, Specificity, Age, Tanzania, Sex
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:2382
Deposited On:05 Jul 2006
Last Modified:21 Dec 2009 16:30

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