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The efforts to limit the International Criminal Court's jurisdiction over nationals of non-party states: a comparative study

Roscini, Marco (2006) The efforts to limit the International Criminal Court's jurisdiction over nationals of non-party states: a comparative study. Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals, 5 (3). pp. 495-527. ISSN 1571-8034

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/157180306778938683

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to discuss and compare the multilateral and bilateral efforts to prevent the ICC from exercising its jurisdiction over nationals of states non-parties to the Rome Statute. In particular, the US secured the adoption of Security Council resolutions no. 1422 (2002), 1487 (2003), 1497 (2003), 1593 (2005) and launched a campaign for the conclusion of bilateral non-surrender agreements: the differences between the resolutions and between them and the agreements are analysed. None of the resolutions above can be qualified as an exercise of the Security Council's power to request the ICC not to commence or proceed with investigations or prosecutions under Article 16 of the Rome Statute, as this provision was not conceived to cover future and hypothetical cases. Furthermore, by adopting resolutions 1422 and 1487 and by including the paragraphs on the exclusive jurisdiction of the contributing state in resolutions 1497 and 1593, the Security Council acted ultra vires, since no threat to the peace can be found in order to justify the exercise of Chapter VII powers. The resolutions are also in contrast with the principles and purposes of the UN. As to the bilateral non-surrender agreements, they cannot be qualified as "international agreements pursuant to which the consent of the sending State is required to surrender a person of that State to the Court" as required by Article 98 (2) of the Statute, since they prohibit the surrender to the ICC of any individual who is "present" on the territory of the other party and they do not require the state to which the accused has been transferred to investigate and prosecute the case. Should Italy conclude a non-surrender agreement with the US, it would incur international responsibility. The law giving effect to such an agreement in the Italian legal order would also be in contrast with Articles 10 (1) and 11 of the Constitution.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Law, School of
ID Code:3531
Deposited On:26 Feb 2007
Last Modified:31 Jul 2014 12:23

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