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Media Studies 2.0: the collapse and rebirth of Media Studies?

Gauntlett, David (2007) Media Studies 2.0: the collapse and rebirth of Media Studies? In: BFI Media Studies Conference, 04 - 06 Jul 2007, BFI Southbank, London. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Earlier this year David Gauntlett published online a short article, Media Studies 2.0, which became widely discussed by Media Studies teachers in the UK and elsewhere. The article noted that we are now in an age where media production is routinely practised by ordinary people – including our students – from their bedrooms, rather than being the sole province of big media institutions; and that traditional ideas of media 'consumption' or 'reception' have correspondingly collapsed, because media engagement is now a two-way street characterised by creativity, sharing and collaboration. Gauntlett argued that this meant that the 'traditional model' of Media Studies was becoming increasingly redundant, and that it must necessarily be superseded by 'Media Studies 2.0' - not a wholesale replacement, but an upgrade designed to deal with 21st century media. In this plenary session, David Gauntlett will present and discuss these ideas with Julian McDougall and the audience. Questions raised include: Does new media affect how we look at all media? Should we now reject the idea that 'experts' can educate students in how to ‘read’ the media? Which research methods are able to deal with the complex media-world which people engage with today? What is the ethical and useful role of Media Studies in the 21st century?

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Additional Information:Keynote opening speech at the BFI Media Studies Conference, London 2007
Uncontrolled Keywords:Audiences, Users, Media Studies 2.0, Internet, Web
Research Community:University of Westminster > Media, Arts and Design, School of
ID Code:5416
Deposited On:18 Aug 2008 12:34
Last Modified:18 Aug 2008 12:34

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