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Dietary starch intake of individuals and their blood pressure: the international study of macronutrients and micronutrients and blood pressure

Brown, Ian J. and Elliott, Paul and Robertson, Claire E. and Chan, Queenie and Daviglus, Martha L. and Dyer, Alan R. and Huang, Chiang-Ching and Rodriguez, Beatriz L. and Sakata, Kiyomi and Ueshima, Hirotsugu and Van Horn, Linda and Zhao, Liancheng and Stamler, Jeremiah (2009) Dietary starch intake of individuals and their blood pressure: the international study of macronutrients and micronutrients and blood pressure. Journal of Hypertension, 27 (2). pp. 231-236. ISSN 0263-6352

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e32831a7294

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Data from the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial show an independent direct association between starch intake and blood pressure in American men at higher risk of coronary heart disease. Cross-sectional data from the International Study of Macronutrients and Micronutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) were used to assess relations of dietary starch intake to blood pressure in men and women from four countries. METHODS: Data include 83 nutrients from four multipass 24-h dietary recalls and two timed 24-h urine collections; eight blood pressure readings; and questionnaire data, for 4680 participants aged 40-59 years from 17 population samples in Japan, People's Republic of China, United Kingdom, and United States of America. RESULTS: In multiple linear regression analyses - adjusted for urinary sodium, urinary potassium, consumption of alcohol, cholesterol, saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, calcium, and other variables - starch intake higher by two standard deviations (14.1% kJ) was associated with systolic/diastolic blood pressure differences of -1.0/-0.9 mmHg (P = 0.09, P < 0.05). Results were similar with additional control for fiber, magnesium, or phosphorus; reduced to -0.5/-0.7 mmHg (P = 0.47, P = 0.13) with separate adjustment for vegetable protein. Findings were similar for men analyzed separately, for American men, and for American men at higher coronary heart disease risk. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that - if any - relations of starch intake to blood pressure are modestly inverse. Current dietary guidelines for hypertension prevention and control remain relevant.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:5684
Deposited On:23 Jan 2009 11:10
Last Modified:11 Jun 2013 12:26

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