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Nineteen-sixties radicalism and its critics: radical utopians, liberal realists and postmodern sceptics

O'Donnell, Mike H. (2008) Nineteen-sixties radicalism and its critics: radical utopians, liberal realists and postmodern sceptics. Psychoanalysis, Culture & Society, 13 (3). pp. 240-260. ISSN 1088-0763

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/pcs.2008.7

Abstract

This article analyses the psychodynamics underlying 1960s radicalism – termed the Movement – in the United States and, more briefly, Britain. The Movement was heuristic and characterized by "utopian" and "humanistic" tendencies. The main sections deal respectively with the counterculture and the New Left. Criticisms of the Movement by liberals contemporary with the radicals and those of more recent commentators are addressed. Analysis of the radical/liberal debate examines two related themes: conflicting psychoanalytic interpretations of the Movement and "the end of ideology" debate. The main ideological formations dealt with are characterized as radical utopianism, liberal realism and postmodern scepticism.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Radicalism, utopian, liberal, realism, participatory democracy
Research Community:University of Westminster > Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, School of
ID Code:6719
Deposited On:05 May 2009 11:25
Last Modified:05 May 2009 11:25

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