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Beliefs about the meaning and measurement of intelligence: a cross-cultural comparison of American, British and Malaysian undergraduates

Swami, Viren and Furnham, Adrian and Maakip, Ismail and Ahmad, Mohd Sharani and Nawi, Nurul Hudani Mohd and Voo, Peter S.K. and Christopher, Andrew N. and Garwood, Jeanette (2008) Beliefs about the meaning and measurement of intelligence: a cross-cultural comparison of American, British and Malaysian undergraduates. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 22 (2). pp. 235-246. ISSN 0888-4080

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1356

Abstract

This study examined lay beliefs about intelligence cross-culturally using a questionnaire based on an expert summary of what is known about intelligence. Two hundred and thirty five university undergraduates in Malaysia, 347 undergraduates in Britain and 137 undergraduates in the US rated for agreement 30 items about the nature, measurement, between-group differences and practical importance of intelligence. An exploratory factor analysis revealed three factors: (1) stability, reliability and validity of intelligence tests; (2) practical importance of intelligence and (3) source and stability of within-group intelligence. While the overall factor structure did not vary a great deal between groups, there were significant cross-cultural differences on the mean scores for Factors 1-3. Explanations for cross-cultural differences in implicit theories of intelligences are considered, and limitations of the study discussed.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, School of
ID Code:6768
Deposited On:06 May 2009 10:10
Last Modified:06 May 2009 10:10

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