Case-control analysis of the health and nutrition of orphan schoolchildren in Ethiopia

Hall, Andrew, Tuffrey, Veronica, Kassa, Tamiru, Demissie, Tsegaye, Degefie, Tedbabe and Lee, Seung (2010) Case-control analysis of the health and nutrition of orphan schoolchildren in Ethiopia. Tropical Medicine & International Health, 15 (3). pp. 287-295. ISSN 1360-2276

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2009.02452.x

Abstract

Summary Objectives - To undertake a case-control analysis of the health, nutrition and caring practices of orphans enrolled in primary schools in Ethiopia. Methods - Pupils of both sexes aged 7-17 who were randomly selected from Grades 3 and 4 of primary school during a national survey of schoolchildren in Ethiopia and who were classified as an orphan were matched by age, sex and school with non-orphans. Logistic regression was used to compare children in terms of indicators of anthropometric and nutritional status, chronic infections, personal hygiene, diet, caring practices and self-reported sensory disability. Results - Of the 7752 children in the national survey, 1283 (16.9%) had lost either both parents or one parent. Of these orphans, 1048 were uniquely pair matched for the case-control analysis. About 60% of orphans had lost their father, and about 20% each had lost their mother or both parents. Orphans had better anthropometric measurements and indices than non-orphans, although the differences were small, and they were less likely to have a goitre (OR = 0.68, P = 0.011). There were no differences in the odds of infections. Orphans were less likely than non-orphans to have eaten breakfast or fruit and vegetables on the previous day and were more likely to report having trouble seeing and hearing. Conclusion - Orphans were slight better nourished than non-orphans, but this could have been a result of asystematic bias in underestimating the age of orphans. The indicators suggested that orphans were less well cared for than non-orphans, but the differences were small.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: University of Westminster > Science and Technology > Life Sciences, School of (No longer in use)
Depositing User: Miss Nina Watts
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2010 14:43
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2010 14:42
URI: http://westminsterresearch.wmin.ac.uk/id/eprint/7373

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