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The effect of intermittent heating on some chemical parameters of refined oils used in Egypt. A public health nutrition concern

Tewfik, Ihab and Ismail, H. and Sumar, S. (1998) The effect of intermittent heating on some chemical parameters of refined oils used in Egypt. A public health nutrition concern. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 49 (5). pp. 339-342. ISSN 0963-7486

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09637489809089408

Abstract

As part of a public health campaign in Egypt, various chemical parameters of oil which are considered good indices in assessing the degree of thermal abuse, oxidation and overall quality (acid values, iodine values, peroxide values, etc.) were studied with respect to different frying oils. Ingestion of decomposition products formed as a results of thermal abuse and oxidation of frying oils are known to lead to a variety of symptoms and diseases (allergies, atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease). Results show that the oil most commonly used by street vendors in Egypt (blend of cotton seed and sunflower oil) is the least suitable for frying, while palm oil on the basis of the various chemical parameters studied, is the ideal choice. However, from the nutritional and public health stand point, the use of saturated oils is to be discouraged. Corn oil is therefore the next best choice from both the chemical and nutritional stand point, and is recommended for public use in a country in which deep-fried vegetable patties ('fallafel') forms the staple food item in the diet.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Life Sciences, School of
ID Code:7497
Deposited On:04 Feb 2010 11:20
Last Modified:04 Feb 2010 11:20

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