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Race, culture and civil society: peacebuilding discourse and the understanding of difference

Chandler, David C. (2010) Race, culture and civil society: peacebuilding discourse and the understanding of difference. Security Dialogue, 41 (4). pp. 369-390. ISSN 0967-0106

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0967010610374314

Abstract

This article seeks to draw out an understanding of the role of narratives and discourses of race, culture and civil society within international peacebuilding, through the location of the discourse of culture as a transitional stage between interventionist and regulatory discourses of race and civil society. It particularly seeks to highlight that the discourse of culture is key to understanding the peacebuilding discourses of intervention and regulation that have developed in the last decade. This is all the more important as the discourse of culture has in many respects been displaced by the discourse of civil society. In drawing out the links between the framings of race, culture and civil society, the article seeks to explain how the discourse of civil society intervention has been reinvented on the basis of the moral divide established and made coherent through the discourse of culture, and how the discourse of civil society contains a strong apologetic content, capable of legitimizing and explaining the persistence of social and economic problems or political fragmentation while simultaneously offering potential policy programmes on the basis of highly ambitious goals of social transformation.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, School of
ID Code:8236
Deposited On:06 Jul 2010 16:32
Last Modified:20 Sep 2010 16:22

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