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Religion, ethnicity, coping style, and self-reported self-harm in a diverse non-clinical UK population

Borrill, Jo (2011) Religion, ethnicity, coping style, and self-reported self-harm in a diverse non-clinical UK population. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 14 (3). pp. 259-269. ISSN 1367-4676

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13674670903485629

Abstract

Previous studies of ethnic and cultural differences in self-harm have focussed on overdose and suicide attempts by South Asian women. Research comparing ethnic groups has rarely examined religion or nationality. To achieve a more balanced approach this study examined self-harm methods and self-injury across gender, religion and ethnic group in a non-clinical population. Six hundred and seventeen university students completed a questionnaire asking whether they had ever harmed themselves, and the frequency and method of any self-harm. White participants and participants with no religious affiliation were more likely to report repeated incidents of self-harm, mainly scratching and cutting skin. Hindu religion was associated with lower levels of repeated self-harm. Asian males were less likely to report self-harm than both Asian females and other males. Black students were less likely to report cutting and scored highest on Rational coping style. The results raise questions about differential disclosure of self-harm across gender and culture.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, School of
ID Code:8292
Deposited On:14 Jul 2010 10:54
Last Modified:11 Jul 2011 15:04

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