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An investigation of self-rated cues believed to influence the judgment of intelligence in a zero-acquaintance context

Swami, Viren and Furnham, Adrian (2012) An investigation of self-rated cues believed to influence the judgment of intelligence in a zero-acquaintance context. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 42 (8). pp. 2064-2076. ISSN 0021-9029

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2012.00942.x

Abstract

This study examined participants' perceptions of the cues they believed to be important when making intelligence judgments in zero-acquaintance contexts. In total, 467 British participants rated 29 items for how important they were when making judgments of intelligence and completed scales measuring their personality, self-assessed intelligence, and demographics. A factor analysis showed that the 29 intelligence cues could be reduced to 4 factors: Physical Cues, Nonphysical Cues, Adornments, and Knowledge. There were no gender differences in ratings of these factors, and Knowledge was rated as the most important factor, followed by Nonphysical Cues, Adornments, and Physical Cues. These factors were weakly associated with participants' personality scores and self-assessed intelligence. Results are discussed in relation to the literature on intelligence judgments.

Item Type:Article
Research Community:University of Westminster > Social Sciences, Humanities and Languages, School of
ID Code:9915
Deposited On:26 Sep 2011 15:52
Last Modified:20 Aug 2012 16:44

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